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Archive for March, 2014

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Good night, baby

8 sleeping positions & their effects on health

Looks like the blog is taking care on your health. Have a closer look how you position your body during the nightsleep.

In what position do you sleep most often? It turns out this is a very important question. Getting enough sleep is the most important thing – but did you know that how you sleep can also impact your health?

Sleeping on your back with your arms at your side is generally considered to be the best sleeping position for spine health and it’s good for your neck too, as long as you don’t use too many pillows.

That said, back sleepers tend to snore more than those in any other position and sleep apnea is strongly associated with sleeping on the back.

Let’s take a look at eight common sleeping positions and what they do to your body.

Thanks to Daily Health Post

So very interesting and anyhow you cannot change it, so why worry

lots of love
d
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so true

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ARE YOU AMBITIOUS ?

am·bi·tious

[am-bish-uhs]  

adjective

1.

having ambition; eagerly desirous of achieving or obtaining success, power, wealth, a specific goal,
2.

showing or caused by ambition: an ambitious attempt to break the record.
3.

strongly desirous; eager: ambitious of love and approval.
4.

requiring exceptional effort, ability, etc.: an ambitious program for eliminating all slums.
1. apathetic, lackadaisical.
He has not been assertive, ambitious , clear —or audacious — enough.
The goal is ambitious  and costly even over alonger time frame.
How an ambitious  experiment in ecological livingled to a goat pen.
Here is what I think
ambitious
We can reach for more than we think we can, so here comes the scientifical explanation,
the OLIVE OF PREVENTION
image002
lots of love from a tired
photo (3)
d
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What we should know

http://heartmath.co.uk/the-hearts-intuitive-intelligence-2/

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Blue Sky News Article: When the solution is the problem

DagmarGrossmann_160180

The old, but nevertheless good question is how do we understand and calculate how any market will develop during the course of this year?

We can assume how it will be, we can ask a psychic to tell us or we can simply get confused by all the different opinions. Using the BASS Formula to gauge market performance is another option, however, what we really want to know is something for which no one really has the answer.

The question is especially difficult to answer in all of the new emerging markets with their incredible micro and macroeconomic factors which are volatile and each and every one of those factors a problem in themselves. So the solution is to wait and see, and in the meantime to adjust to the given conditions.

Eastern Europe has everything; promising markets and some terrible political turmoil. The countries and their political and sociological history are young so there are no comparable events and available data to really predict the future – not even the near future. The gap between rich and poor, geographically north and south and east and west within the various countries varies incredibly and while the internal speed of growth is swift, the pressure from outside increases.

So what can we do?

I still believe that CEE and all CEPA countries are the future markets in Europe. It is important to look more closely at the situation and translate it as much as possible to the economic language of the west.

For example, data has shown that Ukraine has an incredible number of potential UHNWI in the country, with 500 people falling into this category. For sure this number is real, but now, after the political trouble has escalated, it has become an area with as many problems as it has opportunities. Accounts are being frozen outside the Ukraine, financing banks are speechless and some OEMs are learning that it is crucial to understand the cultural language here more than anywhere else in the world.

Even though we are used to a 7-year cycle in business aviation, we try each and every year to answer the question of how to predict the future.

Light travels in waves, as does sound, and of course water. Any vibration across a solid surface is also considered a wave. And waves creates cycles. Herein lies the interesting question; how in a moving environment we can predict a fixed target?

How can we at least get closer to the real numbers that the market will show us at the end of the year? One solution is the BASS Formula (for those who are precise).

 

And it actually says this:

 

Forecasting is the most important thing in leading a company and predicting a market. Many different factors are involved, thousands of books have been written and it is still not really deciphered. But the three main factors are Cycles – Trends – Patterns. Analysing those three gives you for sure a clearer picture of where you stand at any time.

In addition, one of the other tools is:

Forecasting Triggers

When you are forecasting, you must avoid being so myopically or linearly focused on products or aspects of your industry so you do not notice other factors they could impact the industry’s future.

People have use the ‘Hype Cycle’ in the past to become educated about the promise of an emerging technology within the context of their industry and individual appetite for risk.

Should you make an early move or follow the crowd, seeing what your competitive operator does or going alone when entering new markets? If you’re willing to combine risk taking with an understanding that risky investments don’t always pay off, you could reap the rewards of early adoption.

Is a moderate approach appropriate? Executives who are more moderate understand the argument for an early move but will also insist on a sound cost/benefit analysis when new ways of doing things are not yet fully proven. Should you wait for further maturation?

If there are too many unanswered questions around the commercial viability of an emerging market, it may be better to wait until others have been able to deliver tangible value.

Artice by Dagmar Grossmann

 

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DREAM A LITTLE DREAM………

There’s a lot we still don’t understand when it comes to sleep. We know certain changes occur in the brain, and we have a few guesses as to why, but even the experts only have theories about many aspects of sleep in general and dreaming in particular.

Sleep has long been thought of as a way to process, sort and store the day’s events, and more and more research is supporting that notion. Imagine the brain as a second gut, says Rubin Naiman, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist specializing in integrative sleep and dream medicine at the University of Arizona. “At night, the brain metaphorically swallows, digests and sifts through information, and, just like the gut, eliminates,” he says. “What the brain keeps becomes a part of who we are.” Dreaming, he says, is like the brain’s digestive system.

But there’s plenty about dreaming we only think we know. Below, a few of the little-known facts and bogus myths about dreams.

We dream all night long.

We dream all night long.

 

You’ve probably heard that dreams only occur during rapid eye movement or REM sleep. But we’re actually constantly dreaming, says Naiman. We’re more tuned in to dreams during REM sleep, he says, but just because you don’t “see” the dream, doesn’t mean it’s not there. As the night progresses, periods of REM sleep lengthen, so the majority of our dreams occur within the latter third of the night, he says.

 

Insects and fish don’t have REM sleep.
Although some dreams happen outside of REM sleep, identifying rapid eye movement in other species is about as close as we can get to predicting whether those creatures dream, according to University of California researchers. But all mammals and reptiles and some birds do experience REM sleep, and therefore likely dream, according to Popular Science.

You’re less likely to remember a dream if your alarm jolts you awake.

You're less likely to remember a dream if your alarm jolts you awake.

The trauma of an alarm dragging you into the waking world can cause you to forget where you were floating just moments before. The best way to remember your dreams, says Naiman, is to allow yourself to wake up slowly, over a matter of minutes, lolling about in your grogginess. Just don’t try too hard to hold onto those fleeting images. “If you chase a dream, it’s going to run away,” he says.

People who remember their dreams show different brain activity.
A 2014 study found more spontaneous activity in a part of the brain called the temporo-parietal junction among people who regularly recall their dreams, compared with people who rarely do. The differences weren’t just during sleep, but also while study participants were awake. Previous research found that people who remember more dreams also react more to sounds during sleep (and while awake) than people who don’t remember many dreams.

Your body reacts to dreams as it would if you were awake.

Your body reacts to dreams as it would if you were awake.

There’s little as frustrating as waking up mad at someone from something he or she did in a dream, only to realize there’s no way you can talk those feelings out and still sound sane. But biologically, it makes sense that those feelings linger after your eyes open, says Naiman. “The experience we have in the dream registers in the body and in the brain in almost exactly the same way,” he says. Your blood pressure or heart rate might spike, for example, like in a real-life stressful scenario, helping to cement those emotional experiences of the dream, he says.

We dream in real time.
Despite the myth that our dreams occur in a split second, in reality dreams can play out for 20, 30, even 60 minutes, says Naiman. They’re likely only a couple of minutes long at the beginning of the night and lengthen along with REM periods as the night progresses.

Nightmares aren’t always about fear.

Nightmares aren't always about fear.

Bad dreams are surely scary, but there are other underlying emotions at work. In a 2014 study, researchers analyzed dream logs of 331 people and found that many nightmares and bad dreams elicited feelings of failure, worry, confusion, sadness and guilt. The researchers also found that men are more likely to have bad dreams centered around violence or physical aggression, while women’s bad dreams focused on relationship conflict.

Your dreams aren’t weird, that is, until you call them weird.
“When you’re having the dream, no matter how ‘weird’ it is — you’re in a poker game with a giant green squirrel and Queen Mary — it’s not weird,” says Naiman. “It’s only after you wake up and step into the waking world and look at the dream that it seems weird.” Comparing “weird” in the dreaming and waking worlds is like comparing dietary customs in two wildly different cultures, he says, making one seem strange in the context of the other. “We need to refrain from exclusively interpreting dreams from the waking world,” he says — which means it’s time to toss those dream dictionaries.

You can die in your dreams — and live to tell the tale.

You can die in your dreams -- and live to tell the tale.

A great number of people believe the popular myth that dying in a dream means… you’re dead, but Naiman says there’s no truth to it. In fact, he encourages exploring, saying, “If you ever have an opportunity to die in a dream, I say go for it!” Many people report death in dreams to be rather anti-climatic, he says. “Some people would say that’s because consciousness is immortal, independent of the body, but however you look at it it’s an interesting experience.”

Source – Huff Post

my late granny had her own assumptions on dreams – such as – dreaming of hair means someone is not nice with you, or steppig into dogpoo means luck, as much as luck could be. I miss you so much, granny

 

lots of love

d

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ONE, TWO, THREE – MUMMY, DAD and ME

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Being a parent, you should know this..
an unknown doctor wrote this precious oeuvre and it is worth sharing and commenting on it (via vtyd.com)
After 25 years practicing pediatrics, and caring for thousands of children, I’ve noticed some patterns that offer me a deeper vision of health. Here are some of those invaluable lessons:

1. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT ARE NOT A RACE. 

These days we’re in such a rush to grow up. In our mechanized, post-industrialized world of speed and efficiency, we’ve forgotten that life is a process of ripening. To get good fruit, you need to nourish strong roots. Pay attention to the ground that supports your child’s life: Go for a walk with your child, eat with your child, play together, tell him a story about your experience as a child.

2. CREATING FAMILY TRADITIONS ENCOURAGES STRONG ROOTS AND A HEALTHY LIFE. 

This takes time and practice. Personal traditions are sacred because they promote exchanges that strengthen bonds of love and intimacy and build the kind of confidence that will carry your child through this world.

3. WE GROW IN CYCLES. 

There is a rhythm and pulse to each child’s life – sometimes fast and intense, sometimes slow and quiet. Just as each spring brings a renewed sense of appreciation for life, each stage of a child’s life is a time of new discovery and wonder. After all, learning is not just a process of accruing information. It’s the process of transforming our ideas, and sometimes this requires forgetting in order to see with fresh eyes. Some children will take a step backward before making a giant leap forward.

Growing in cycles means that we don’t get just one chance to learn something. The same lesson will offer itself up to us again and again as we pass through the seasons of our life. There is deep forgiveness in this way of understanding childhood, which I find takes the pressure off parents to “get it right” the first time.

4. ENCOURAGEMENT IS NOT THE SAME AS INDULGENCE. 

We are not in the business of raising little kings and queens. Kings don’t do well in our society. Recent studies have shown that indulgence actually weakens your child’s powers to survive, deflating motivation and diminishing feelings of success.

Encouragement means putting courage in your child, not doing things for him. Create a supportive context that will open up a path without pushing your child down it. Unconditional love is the scaffolding that encourages your child to take chances, to experiment, and to fail without judgment. Sometimes being an encouraging presence in your child’s life means standing a little off in the background, there to offer a compassionate hand when circumstances call for it, but trusting in his innate ingenuity.

There is spaciousness in encouragement. Indulgence, on the other hand, limits freedom by inflating a child’s sense of entitlement and reducing the patience needed to work through obstacles when he doesn’t instantly get his way. Indulgence leads to small-minded thinking.

5. PUSHING YOUR BUTTONS IS A SPIRITUAL PRACTICE, AND CHILDREN ARE OUR SPIRITUAL TEACHERS. 

You don’t need an expensive spiritual retreat to become enlightened. Your little sage-teacher is right in front of you, offering you true wisdom free of charge!

Children watch our every move when they’re little, studying our inconsistencies as they try to figure out this crazy world. And they will call you on it. When a child pushes your buttons, remember: they are your buttons, not hers. Take the time to listen to what your child is trying to teach you. One of the secrets of parenthood is our willingness to transform ourselves out of love for our child. When you’re willing to look at your buttons, you open up a deeper self-awareness that is transformative for both you and your child.

6. A SYMPTOM IS THE BODY’S WAY OF LETTING US KNOW SOMETHING HAS TO CHANGE. 

Good medicine asks what is the symptom trying to accomplish? rather than simply suppressing it. Our body has its own intelligence and yet so much of pharmaceutical advertising tries to convince us that there is something wrong with feeling symptoms. Much of my medical training was focused on stopping symptoms as if they were the problem. (This is like telling the body to shut up. It’s rude!) We don’t trust the body’s intelligence. We think too much and tend to be afraid of feelings in our body.

But children have taught me that a symptom like fever is actually not the problem. Whatever is causing the fever may be a problem, but the temperature is simply the body’s way of trying to deal with what’s happening.

Take, for example, the child with a fever. What other symptoms does the child have? If he is playful, you may not need to suppress the fever. It means the body is trying to make metabolic heat to mobilize the immune system. To help it do this, you can give warm (not cold) fluids so it doesn’t dry out and nourishing foods like soups to fuel the fire.

7. BE PREPARED. 

The one phrase from the Eagle Scout motto that stuck with me since I was a boy was Be prepared. This is a state of readiness that can be fueled by confidence or fear.

These days I practice what I call “preparatory medicine” rather than preventive medicine, so that getting sick is not seen as a failure. Being healthy does not mean never getting sick. Life is a journey of ups and downs and the growing child lives in a constant state of flux. A resilient immune system is one that learns how to get sick and get better. Living too clean a life robs us of the information necessary to be fully prepared to recover.

Rather than living in fear of illness, there are natural ways we can support our children to recovery from illness quickly and efficiently: good nutrition, hydration, probiotics, rest and exercise. But the most important? Rather than focusing on how often your child gets sick, celebrate how often she gets better.

8. HEALING TAKES TIME. 

The most alternative medicine I practice these days is taking time. As a society, we’re addicted to quick fixes because we have no time to be sick anymore. As a doctor, I was trained as a kind of glorified fireman, looking to put out emergencies quickly and efficiently.

In emergencies, strong medicine is often necessary to save lives but most health problems in childhood are not emergencies. In those instances it takes more than strong medicine to get better; it takes time. I realize that taking another day off from work because a child has been sent home from school with a runny nose can add real stress to our already stressful lives. But children have taught me that healing is a kind of developmental process that has its own stages too.

When we don’t take time to recover, we rob our children of the necessary stages they need to learn from if they are to develop long-lasting health. When we take time to recover, illness becomes a journey of discovery, not just a destination; we begin to see our health and illness as two sides of the same coin.

9. THE SECRET OF LIFE IS LETTING GO. 

Life is a process of constantly giving way. Things pushed past their prime transform into something else. Just as spring gives way to summer, so is each stage of development a process of letting go. Crawling gives way to walking. Babbling gives way to speaking. Childhood gives way to adolescence. By breathing in, you breathe out. By eating, you poop.

Each season, each stage, each little rhythm of our life is a matter of letting go. This allows us to get rid of what we don’t need to make room in our lives for new information. Learning to let go is not always easy and each child has his own adaptive style and timing. Nature favors diversity. Remember to honor your child’s unique nature. This is what my book Fire Child Water Child is all about.

Perhaps the most important way children teach me how to let go is in the way they play. Playing means letting go of our inhibitions; it frees us up and allows us not to take ourselves too seriously.

 

uboot

10. TRUST YOURSELF: YOU’RE THE EXPERT ON YOUR CHILD. 

One of the most important things I teach new parents is how to trust themselves. Nowhere is this more daunting than when a new baby comes into our life. We’re expected to know everything and yet we feel like we know nothing. But children have taught me that this knowing-nothing can be a real opportunity to open our powers of intuition.

Mindful parenting begins by listening with an open heart to your child’s life without fear or panic. Studies have shown that a mother’s intuition is more powerful than any lab test in picking up problems. Unfortunately today we are flooded with so much scary information that it interferes with our ability to listen to our own intuition. (Just think of the arrogance of a doctor who acts like he knows your child better than you do!)

Take a tip from your baby. Look into your baby’s eyes. Imagine what it feels like to be conscious of the world before you have language, before all those labels that scare us and divide things into good and bad, right and wrong. Babies have no enemies. This is seeing from the source. It is what Zen Buddhists call “beginner’s mind.” Watch closely how your baby breathes with his belly. This is Qigong breathing. Stop thinking for a moment and try breathing this way. You may just find the answers you need waiting for you there.

11. TAKE THE LONG VIEW. (BECAUSE IT’S EASY TO GET CAUGHT IN THE IMMEDIACY OF A PROBLEM, ESPECIALLY AT 2AM.)

Having watched thousands of children grow into adulthood, what sometimes seems like a big deal at four-months old or 14-years old may be no more than a small bump in the road. Children have taught me how to take the long view of life. When we step back and see the big picture of our lives, we discover wisdom and compassion.

baby

Could not resist to post it, so true, love your children and take care on them, their life is in your hands and they are just guest who ask for the way (acc to Khalil Ghibran, and he is right)

I love my both sons, they are the greatest gift in my entire life and the best teachers.

 

lots of love

d

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SLEEP TIGHT WORLD

How Long To Nap For The Biggest Brain Benefits

Taking a nap, we’ve seen time and again, is like rebooting your brain.  Everyone likes to get a quick nap in every now and then, but napping may be as much of an art as it is a science. The Wall Street Journal offers recommendations for planning your perfect nap, including how long to nap and when.The sleep experts in the article say a 10-to-20-minute power nap gives you the best “bang for your buck,” but depending on what you want the nap to do for you, other durations might be ideal.  For a quick boost of alertness, experts say a 10-to-20-minute power nap is adequate for getting back to work in a pinch.biggest-bran-benefits sleep-For cognitive memory processing, however, a 60-minute nap may do more good, Dr. Mednick said. Including slow-wave sleep helps with remembering facts, places and faces. The downside: some grogginess upon waking.“If you take it longer than 30 minutes, you end up in deep sleep. Have you ever taken a nap and felt worse when you woke up? That’s what’s happening — you’re sleeping too long and you’re going into a stage of sleep that’s very difficult to get out of.” – Dr. Michael Breus

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Finally, the 90-minute nap will likely involve a full cycle of sleep, which aids creativity and emotional and procedural memory, such as learning how to ride a bike. Waking up after REM sleep usually means a minimal amount of sleep inertia, Dr. Mednick said.

In fact, a study published in PubMed in 2002 found that napping even for 5-10 minutes creates a heightened sense of alertness and increased cognitive ability in comparison to no nap.  So really, you want to be taking a 10-20 minute nap for a quick recharge, or a 60-90 minute nap for a deep sleep rejuvenation.

In addition to those recommendations, one surprising suggestion is to sit slightly upright during your nap, because it will help you avoid a deep sleep. And if you find yourself dreaming during your power naps, it may be a sign you’re sleep deprived.

 

So good night everybody for the next 30 min…….

sleep

lots of love d